1861 SW Gatlin Blvd

Port St Lucie, FL 34953 US

772-873-4745

Eye Care

A healthy cat' eyes should be clear and bright and the area around the eyeball white.

Common Symptoms of Illness

  • Red inner eyelids
  • Matter "stuck" on the surface or in the corners of the eye
  • Cloudiness within the eyeball
  • A dull eye surface
  • The "third eyelid" coming across the eye
  • Excessive tearing or unusual discharges
  • Tear-stained fur around the eyes

Eye Tests used to Diagnose Eye Problems

  • Fluoresceinstain to identify the presence of corneal ulcers
  • Schirmer Tear Test to determine the level of tear production
  • Ocular pressure to detect glaucoma
  • Ophthalmoscopeto see in the eye chamber

Common Eye Conditions & Symptoms

Conjunctivitis is an inflammation of the membrane that covers both the inner lining of the eyelid and the white of the eye. It may be caused by allergies or by bacterial, fungal or viral infections. In fact, recurrent or chronic conjunctivitis in cats is often the result of herpes viral infections which, just as in humans, can return – again and again. It can be contagious between cats, so keep an infected cat away from other cats.

Corneal Ulceration can occur when the surface of the cornea is scratched or damaged, either as the result of a cat fight or more seriously, a bacterial or viral infection.

Watery Eyes
If your cat' eyes constantly "weep" or if the fur around them appears "stained", he may suffer from this inherited defect, in which a malformation of the tear ducts blocks the normal flow of tears.

Cataracts & Glaucoma
Cats, just like humans, can have these serious eye diseases. Cataracts, which cloud the lens inside the eye, are most often seen in elderly or diabetic cats. A thorough evaluation by your veterinarian is necessary, as surgery is the only treatment. Glaucoma stems from too much pressure being exerted upon the eye's interior as a result of a decrease in the amount of fluid draining from it. 

How to Administer Eye Drops

  1. Remove any discharge around the eye with a cotton ball moistened with saline solution.
  2. Hold your cat sideways on your lap or place him on a table at a comfortable height (you may want someone to help restrain your cat if you choose the second option).
  3. See the instructions on the bottle for dosage. Shake if necessary.
  4. Use one hand to hold the bottle between thumb and index while using the other to support the cat' head.
  5. Tilt the head back and, to prevent blinking, use your free fingers to hold the eyelids open.
  6. Hold the bottle of drops close to the eye but DON'T touch the eye' surface.
  7. Squeeze, aiming the drops at the centre of the eye, then release the head after the drops are in the eye.
  8. Your cat will blink, spreading the medication over the eye' surface.

How to Apply Eye Ointment

  1. Remove any discharge around the eye with a cotton ball moistened with saline solution.
  2. Hold your cat sideways on your lap or place him on a table at a comfortable height (you may want someone to help restrain your cat if you choose the second option).
  3. Check the instructions on the tube for dosage.
  4. Gently pull back upper and lower eyelids.
  5. Hold the tube parallel to the lower eyelid, squeeze out the ointment onto the edge of the eyelid (about the size of a grain of rice).
  6. Release the head and let your cat blink.
  7. If necessary massage upper and lower eyelids together to spread the medication.

IMPORTANT: Always administer medicine to its full term for it to be effective. When administering medication stay calm – your pet can sense if you are nervous making it more difficult to apply the treatment. Always praise and reward your pet with a treat.

Office Hours

Monday:

8:00 am-6:00 pm

Tuesday:

8:00 am-6:00 pm

Wednesday:

8:00 am-6:00 pm

Thursday:

8:00 am-6:00 pm

Friday:

8:00 am-6:00 pm

Saturday:

8:00 am-5:00 pm

Sunday:

Closed

Location

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